Whine less, work more

This guy studied hard. He very quickly became first the best student in the group, then on the stream. But that's not all. In addition to studying, he found time for business.

When I entered the institute, in my group there was a boy from India - Jay. The name seemed strange to us, what kind of “jay” is this? Letter of the English alphabet or "DJ"? But Jay, without offense, in bad Russian and impeccable English, told everyone that Jay means “victory” in Hindi. By the way, his Russian then became very good, literally a year later - the guy obviously had an ability for languages. “We all learned a little something and somehow,” Pushkin said this about me and most of my fellow students. But this is not about Jay. This guy studied hard. He very quickly became first the best student in the group, then on the stream. But that's not all. In addition to studying, he found time for business. His relatives passed from India a wide variety of brass and bronze jewelry, door handles, locks, furniture fittings, and so on. Jay opened a small shop where he sold all these things at a decent profit. It turns out that in his hometown this is the most common business - the production of various trinkets from brass.

Jay was the first in our class to buy a car with his hard-earned money. By the end of his studies, he already had an apartment, and he opened shops selling bronze and brass crafts in several neighboring cities. He graduated from the institute with honors, but refused to return to India, although he was guaranteed an excellent job there, by Indian standards. This is what he told me then: “I was the seventh of nine children, and nine more of my parents died. My parents earned three dollars a day - two dollars for my father and one dollar for my mother. Since childhood, I had to climb the dumps in the suburbs of Calcutta and look for additional food for myself, my brothers and sisters. And from the age of eleven I already worked in the workshop of a coppersmith. And I also studied well, because at that moment I believed that only education would pull me out of poverty. You consider India to be the largest country in the world, but most of the people there live the way I did. Therefore, the opportunity to go to study with you was tantamount to winning the lottery for me. When you complain that you have a bad life in your country, there is no democracy, a crisis, no prospects for the development of business and personality, it becomes ridiculous to me. You don't understand what "no prospects" means. You should try to survive in India.” I often remember his words in difficult life situations.

Author: Oleg