Romance from the high road.

The fates of special forces and martial artists are in many ways similar. At a certain stage, a professional syndrome develops - post-traumatic stress disorder of the psyche.

The fates of special forces and martial artists are similar in many ways. At a certain stage, people who have had a chance to take part in hostilities and combat athletes develop a professional syndrome - post-traumatic stress disorder. For military personnel who have passed through hot spots, this cider can be compared with the Afghan one, and for athletes, it can be called the martial arts syndrome or Mirzaev's syndrome. And this is where the big differences begin.

Returning at two in the morning with my wife from the guests and walking around Moscow at night, for a long time I felt on my back the eyes of a night traveler, whose route surprisingly coincided with ours, right up to the backyard of my house. The night "reveler" (as it turned out during the "contact", a professional boxer) was not at all embarrassed that he was alone. He, a martial artist, was convinced of the strength of his fists and simply did not expect to run into a commando. If in my place a person unprepared for contact martial arts, then at best two insensible bodies with empty pockets would lie on the pavement for several hours. And in the worst case, the outcome could well repeat the result of the meeting between the world champion in mixed martial arts R. Mirzaev and student I. Agafonov - with the only difference that he would not have received such a wide resonance in society.

So where do these "highway romantics" from sports come from, well organized in groups or even touring alone? Why are thousands of people daily exposed to danger from borsets, gop-stoppers, etc.?

Statistics show that many organized and not-so-criminal gangs have former and current martial artists in their ranks, where they can use their skills "for their intended purpose."

I want to emphasize that these are not the numerous young people who go to sections and clubs in order to cultivate courage in themselves, gain strength of mind, learn to control their bodies, become stronger and more resilient. No. For most of these people, playing sports is a hobby, in addition to which there is study, work, business, and many other exciting activities.

We are talking about martial artists who, watching the same fights without rules on TV screens or with their own eyes, put all their strength, time and health at stake in order to climb the Olympus of victory and become the champion (of the country, Europe, peace). But… a little was not enough. I lost in the decisive battle, for example, to the same R. Mirzaev by one point. He did not become a champion and understands that his strength, and most importantly, his health, will no longer be enough for the next cycle of the fight for the champion title. What remains for this martial artist, who, having never climbed the podium (although he was next to it), has big health problems, since the blows and tricks of the opponent that have reached the goal do not pass without a trace (fractures of the limbs, serious head injuries), but has no education or job? Most often they fall into the tenacious clutches of crime.

Among the sports where there are many traumatic, power martial arts stand apart and are potentially socially dangerous. A kind of high-risk sport for others, and therefore for society as a whole.

I catch myself thinking that the fates of special forces and combat athletes are in many ways similar. At a certain stage, people who have had a chance to take part in hostilities and combat athletes develop a professional syndrome - post-traumatic stress disorder. For military personnel who have passed through hot spots, this cider can be compared with the Afghan one, and for athletes, it can be called the martial arts syndrome or Mirzaev's syndrome. And this is where the big differences begin.

If a soldier fulfills his duty due to state necessity, then the future martial artist is drawn to the ring by advertising of such fights, the desire to become famous and get rich, following the example of great champions. There is only one Olympus for a champion, and there are very, very many people involved in this sport. In fact, the life of these people is much darker than TV pictures of championship fights with long-legged blondes in bikinis defiling in the ring between rounds and often ends in a criminal environment.

It is necessary to understand that “hitting the tails of crimes” with the participation of martial artists is ineffective if you do not stop cultivating violence by demonstrating “gladiator fights” without rules by the media.

It should be recognized that the losses of society from the promotion of power martial arts are much greater than the gains. In the pyramid of sporting achievements, martial artists who claimed the podium and, in fact, learned to kill, carry a serious threat to society.

It seems to me that it is time for all of us to think about the fact that from the era of “gladiator fights” as the tip of a huge iceberg of socially dangerous negativity, it is time to move on to the next step in our development.

If we, speaking about the health and development of the nation, today consider it necessary to fight drugs, limit opportunities for smokers, ban alcohol advertising, then why don’t we limit advertising and promotion of sports that are unsafe for society, which are power wrestling? Maybe then hundreds of thousands of boys will understand that thrashing their opponent with their hands and feet is far from the only occupation in life, and even more so not the only tool in order to become a real man and a successful person? What do you think?Author: Alexey Filatov "Private Correspondent"